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Josh Atwell

Josh_Atwell

Josh Atwell

Splunk

Josh is a Senior Technology Advocate at Splunk, focused on helping IT organizations evolve to support the growing demands on them. He has worked within the realm of IT for over 20 years beginning with desktop support and moving through automating enterprise architecture and operations. He has spent the last 10 years working publicly to improve the way IT is managed, automated, and delivers value to business. His most recent focuses have been in DevOps, Digital Transformation, and IT Transformation. Josh is the co-author of several popular books, a serial podcaster, has led numerous technology user groups, and is an awarded public speaker. Never known for lacking an opinion he guest blogs on various platforms and tweets at @josh_atwell.

Session: How to be a Failure and Still Succeed

Failure is not always bad, it just feels bad. Failure is also typically the most powerful teacher, which sounds pretty positive. Unfortunately, people and organizations often point to past failures as a reason to avoid further investment and learning. "We can't do 'that' here because we tried once and it didn't work"

We all fail from time to time, so why is it that collectively we have a poor attitude about failure? Why do we attempt to hide our mistakes? Why is this even worse in IT and technology? Might we ALL learn more if we had a better attitude around failure? Can an improved attitude about failure increase success in digital transformation and DevOps adoption?

In this talk I'll share some of the psychological structures around failure and then provide ways that we can make failure a positive part of our professional and organizational development. We'll explore the role failure has in increasing performance and achieving organizational goals. I will talk about how there is nothing wrong with being a failure; it's more about how we all respond to our failures.